Review our Services on Carehome.co.uk - We want to hear from you...

The feedback we receive at Belmont healthcare is vital to how we maintain our quality of services. This year so far we have had some amazing feedback on what we do which is a testament to people within our care teams and their dedication to care for our residents.

Review Us on Carehome.co.uk

Review Us on Carehome.co.uk

If you didn't know all our services are on carehome.co.uk in the Groups section and you can review all the services we provide by going to the website by clicking above or clicking the individual service links below

The feedback is great for us and helps recognise the positive works our teams do within each care environment - We Look forward to hearing from your reviews

Thanks 

The Belmont Healthcare Team

Edendale Care Home - Continues with another "GOOD" CQC Rating

Belmont Sandbanks Care Group congratulates manager Theresa Toal and her fantastic team at Edendale Care Home in Hastings, East Sussex. This week receiving "Good" in all 5 main areas for the 2nd consecutive CQC inspection. Edendale has know been through the new methodology on 2 separate occasions in 2015 and now 2017 receiving 5 Good ratings on both occasions.

This is a credit to the leadership of Theresa Toal as manager and the high level of care support she receives from all the team on every shift at Edendale Care Home in Hastings.

The home cares for people over 65 with Dementia and other related illnesses and offering a wide range of community support.

This report is a credit to the staff at the Care home who work tirelessly to create a safe and valued environment for those in need.

WELL DONE EVERYONE!!

Check the inspection report here on our website 

EDENDALE CQC REPORT

Belmont Sandbanks becomes Supporter of the Care Workers Charity

In 2017 Belmont Sandbanks Care Group MD Adam Hutchison became a board of trustees member for the Care Workers Charity - formerly the Care Workers Benevolent Fund. 

As part of this Belmont Sandbanks Care Group has become a Gold Supporter of the charity and the services in which it is supporting now and in future years. This is a fantastic charity which supports the basic welfare of current, former and retired care workers. There are nearly 2 million care workers in the UK, contributing to one of Britain’s largest workforces, and caring for some of the most vulnerable people in our society. Early starts, long hours, mentally draining work; it’s all part of the job. But add an injury, illness or other unforeseen circumstance and all but too easily things can take their toll, and push beyond financial limits.

The good people of the care sector make a massive contribution to peoples everyday lives. The Care Workers Charity helps current, former and retired workers on their rainy day.

To view more information about The Care Workers Charity and its team, please visit the About Us page.

To find out more about the charity nd what you can do go to http://www.thecareworkerscharity.org.uk/ 

Local Care group employee wins award for new local service. (Press Release)

 

Kent and East Sussex based Belmont Sandbanks Care Group, have recently been acknowledged for their excellent contribution to the local community in New Romney, Kent. The care provider focuses on support for vulnerable adults with Dementia and related community support schemes.

 

These awards are focused on frontline staff members and not the businesses. This is about promoting fantastic community services which take place everyday in Kent and Medway. Having had 4 nominations in this year’s Kent Care Awards (www.kica.care), which took place on 7th October 2016 in Dover. Over 250 people attended the awards involved all care providers across Kent and Medway with the awards ceremony. Independent judging for the awards took place in Ashford in early September 2016. 

Belmont Sandbanks eventually ended with 3 runners up in the awards for:

·      The Care Home manager award (Sarah Pennington) for Madeira Lodge Care Home in New Romney,

·      The Ancillary Worker Award (Kevin Beale) for Madeira Day Care Centre also in New Romney

·      Putting People First & Personalisation Award (Janice Dye) also at Madeira Day Care Centre also in New Romney

And finally Mary Kendall – Was the Winner of the Home Care Worker Award for Belmont Home Care Services in Romney Marsh and surrounding areas – this was for her overall contribution and Hardwork in supporting people in their own homes. Having only set up the service in the last 12 months due to the lack of availability for those in need in the Marsh and surrounding areas. By winning this awards Mary is now entered into the South East and London regional finals in London on 26th November 2016 with a chance to advance further to the national finals of the Great British Care Awards (www.care-awards.co.uk) which take place in the Spring of 2017. These national awards have been running for 8 years.

The judges of the awards commented that “Home Care provision was a relatively new offering for the business and Mary was the first employee to begin supporting people in their own homes. Not only did she aid in the initial grounding of the service but her passion and desire to continue to offer an excellent level of service to all new clients being introduced to the service. Mary works tirelessly to the point where she sometimes she has to be told to stop and take a rest. Her passion for care and excellent skills with being a companion to those in need is second to none” 

To find our more about their services visit their website at www.belmontsandbanks.co.uk

 

Care Act for carers: One year on

We welcome the findings of the Carers Trust’s new report ‘Care Act for carers: One year on’.

This shows that there are some carers who are getting good support under the Care Act, as well as some examples of good practice.

It also shows what needs to improve. Too many carers were unaware of their rights. Practitioners need to understand that a carer’s right to support is independent of the person they care for.

Andrea Sutcliffe, Chief Inspector of Adult Social Care said:

“I welcome this report and was very pleased to be invited to provide evidence. Support for carers is an important feature that CQC has to see in order to award a Good or Outstanding rating. The best services we see value the contribution that carers can make and proactively consider their needs as well as the needs of people using services.

“Carers’ organisations are involved in our coproduction meetings that develop the way we work and I am grateful for their contribution.”

The 1st Annual Kent Care Awards 2016

KiCA presents

The 1st Annual Kent Care Awards 2016

in Association with the Great British Care Awards

Get your best gown and tuxedo at the ready because the new annual Kent Care event is here… The 1st Annual Care Awards will take place in 2016 to celebrate the work carried out in our great Care sector in Kent. This is a chance to reward the people you work with, work for you or simply people you know in the sector who have been superheroes and delivered something awesome this year and every year.

As Care businesses in Kent this is our opportunity to reward those that really matter  – so lets celebrate the successes of our staff and grow our appreciation for the work they do for in this sector. This is the 1st of Annual Kent Care Awards were we all will celebrate the care sector in this great county of Kent and have an evening to remember.

The Executive Board at KiCA want to hear your nominations for all the awards that will be given out to celebrate great care work in Kent. Your votes truly count and it is important we all engage to build on a successful year so far.

The judging of the awards will take place on 8th September 2016 with a plethora of independent selected judges from the sector. The deadline for nominations is 31st August 2016 so get them in now on our nominations page is live RIGHT HERE!

There are 12 Categories for awards all are linked to Care Homes, LDMH and Home Care Services in Kent so if you have team members who you wish to celebrate and promote their excellent work then let us know we want to hear from you:

Categories for Awards are:

  • The Care Home Worker Award
  • The Home Care Worker Award
  • The Care Home Registered Manager Award
  • The Home Care Supervisor/Leader Award
  • The Ancillary Worker Award
  • The Dementia Carer Award
  • The Care Trainer Award
  • The Care Innovator Award
  • The Care Assessor Award
  • The Nurse Care Award
  • The Putting People First/ Personalisation Award
  • The Care Nutrition Award

So please go to our nominations page and make your nominations NOW!

Remember all winners of the awards will automatically be entered in the nominations for the Great British Care Awards South East section in Brighton in November – we are officially linked to this awards to find out more about them at http://www.care-awards.co.uk/ 

Let the celebrations begin as the winners will be announced at the 1st Annual Kent Care Awards Gala Evening – Get out your best gown and black tie for the gents – as we are going to celebrate our sector in Kent in Style.

The Awards Gala will be held on Friday 7th October 2016 starting at 7.00pm.

Venue: The Ramada Hotel, Dover, Kent

http://www.ramadadover.co.uk/contact/Location-of-Ramada-Hotel/

We hope you invite your teams and your nominees from your businesses as this is their night and an evening for us all to get together and enjoy the great work we all do for the care sector in Kent.

Your Tables include the evening festivities, Food (Buffet Style), Awards & Late night DJ through to 1am. With prize draws and charity donations.

So to find out more about tables and booking your table for the evening now please get in touch with us at info@kica.care or check out the website here

For more information or details on the nominations process, the evening or is you wish to get involved with organisation and sponsorship contact us on marketing@kica.care - all queres and questions are welcome.

We hope to see you all there we hope it will be a night to remember and the beginning of a special event which will run year on year.

Our thanks form all the KiCA Executive Board.

In conjunction with our principal sponsors Kieran Lynch & Co – The VAT Specilaists

KiCA’s New media sponsor check for information and content on the sector in partnership with the KiCA & the Care Association Alliance.

Could music projects cut the cost of dementia care?

Sheer embarrassment was dementia care worker Lynda Kelly’s overwhelming emotion the first time she sat in on a  orchestra music therapy session at the residential home where she works; but the lasting change she saw in the residents in response to the musicians was so great that she is now running weekly improvisation sessions at the home.

Kelly, the activities coordinator for Acacia Lodge – a 60-bed residential home in New Moston, Manchester – reports seeing a mute female resident with advanced Alzheimer’s sing Swing Low, Sweet Chariot at top volume with all the words in one of the first Camerata sessions. Two other former non-speakers now communicate with staff as though they had never stopped and many more display greater confidence, increased activity levels and more cooperation with their carers.

“The first music session I went to, I did not know where to put myself with embarrassment – I was not used to seeing people sing and express themselves like that,” says Kelly, who has since then been involved in three music and dementia projects with the chamber orchestra over the past three years, including a 10-week course for Acacia Lodge residents. “But the impact has been amazing and I realised within two weeks that music was getting to them in a completely different way.”

Manchester Camerata orchestra’s Music in Mind (MIM) projects, which involved 7,200 people in care homes and community projects acrossGreater Manchester last year, have had such dramatic effects on participants that academics at Manchester and Lancaster universities are backing a research student to create the world’s first in-the-moment, multi-sensory assessment tool to quantify that effect.

Manchester Camerata’s head of educational outreach, Nick Ponsillo, says: “This is all about helping people with dementia to communicate and to feel part of the community, but we need to know that we are really getting to the guts of a patient’s experience.”

The Camerata – whose reputation with audiences is built on concerts of Mozart and Beethoven in venues such as the Bridgewater Hall – now hosts Manchester University PhD student psychologist Robyn Dowlen to carry out research in collaboration with Lancaster University. She is attempting to measure the effect of music on people who may not be able to communicate it in words.

This is about coming up with the proof that there is more to music in a dementia context than just entertainment. According to the Alzheimer’s Society, there will be 1 million people with dementia in the UK by 2025 and one in six people over the age of 80 currently have it. Alzheimer’s is a massive health and social care challenge to which management approaches are needed in a cash-strapped world.

Camerata’s projects – led by a professional music therapist and specially-trained musicians from the orchestra – involve working directly with patients with degenerative brain disease and their carers. It is about encouraging them to sing, play instruments and create music – and even to perform in public, in sessions before Camerata concerts.

Dowlen’s supervisor, Prof John Keady, who leads the dementia and ageing research team at Manchester University, is excited about the MIM projects, which he sees as confirming his view of dementia as a loss of self and social identity, rather than the more common view of it as a loss of creative and cognitive skills.

He hopes that Dowlen will be able to produce a means of measuring an individual’s experience of connection, so that the circumstances can be reproduced when people engage in other activities.

Evaluation of MIM projects in Rochdale and Tameside by New Economy paints a consistent picture of better communication, happier and more cooperative patients, and even suggests that music participation may lead to a reduction in the amount of NHS treatments and anti-psychotic medication required. Numbers are small, but it is an area researchers want to investigate.

Keady is even asking himself whether the right kind of music projects actually cut the cost of dementia care.

Ponsillo has noticed a change in attitude from health and social care sectors since work on projects began in 2010, from lack of interest to a desire for collaboration. Rochdale has had projects in two care homes and two community centres last year, and Tameside Public Health is currently funding 30-week projects in four care homes – plus music training for carers to help them continue the work themselves – despite enduring budget cuts. Four other projects are also ready to start next month in central and north Manchester.

Angela Wild, programme officer for Tameside Public Health and dementia champion, is clear: “This work is leaving a lasting impression. The money Tameside is spending on 30 sessions is money well spent. Everyone should be doing it.”

Ponsillo has just returned from Japan, where he was invited to address cultural organisations keen to learn from the Camerata’s experience about how to set up music schemes for people with dementia, given the ever-growing elderly population.

Creative music projects can clearly benefit those with dementia, but other performing arts are making an impact too. West Yorkshire Playhouse has won awards for its work in the field with drama, and Liverpool-based Indian traditional dancer Bisakha Sarker has witnessed powerful effects with movement.

Given David Cameron’s launch of the prime minister’s challenge on dementia 2020, the public health minister, Jane Ellison, is keeping an eye on what is happening in Manchester. She said: “For many people with dementia, music and other arts-based activities can make a real difference to their sense of wellbeing and quality of life. We are working to create more dementia-friendly communities. Manchester Camerata’s work is great example of what can be done to help people live well with dementia.”

Carers – The UK’s unsung heroes – What can we give back?

The UK’s 7m unpaid carers are amongst the most giving people we know.

They are all around us, caring for mums, husbands, daughters, sons, brothers, grans, friends….the list is endless, and they do this free of charge and unconditionally because they have an emotional connection with the person they care for.

Anyone can be a carer, a 7 year old boy helping his mum with her cancer treatments, a 90 year old woman supporting her husband with dementia, a 30 year old dad caring for his daughter born with cerebral palsy or a 60 year old woman caring for her dad who is old and frail.

3 in 5 of us will be a carer at some point, carers are all around us, propping up our health and social care systems, preventing winter deaths, keeping people out of our stretched A&E departments, providing a wide array of nursing and personal care tasks and ensuring people with care needs don’t become lonely and isolated.

Along with caring, unpaid carers have their own lives to lead at school, at work, with family and in the community, but they just keep on giving, sometimes at great personal cost to their own health and wellbeing. In fact the economic value of their gift is estimated at around £135bn every year, and its growing as our demography changes and we all live longer.

So, we should all ask ourselves, what can we give back to carers?

This blog was produced by @LuenThompson, who is the Director or Marketing and Communications at the @CarersTrust.